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List of railway stations and locations: A

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Station/locationOriginal railway companyTimetablesStatus
Abbeyhill JunctionNorth British Railway--
Aberdeen HarbourAberdeen Harbour Trustees' Tramways--
Aberdeen JointDenburn Valley lineOpen
AberdourAberdour Line (North British Railway)Edinburgh (Waverley) & Glasgow (Queen Street) to Kirkcaldy, Dundee, Arbroath, Montrose & AberdeenOpen
AberfeldyAberfeldy Branch (Highland Railway)Ballinluig & AberfeldyClosed
AberladyAberlady, Gullane & North Berwick RailwayAberlady & GullaneClosed
AbernethyEdinburgh & Northern RailwayClosed
AbingtonCaledonian RailwayGlasgow (Central) and Edinburgh (Princes Street) to Carlisle and SouthClosed
AchnasheenDingwall & Skye RailwayOpen
Airdrie (Hallcraig Street)Ballochney Railway-Closed
Airdrie SouthBathgate & Coatbridge RailwayOpen
Alexandra ParadeCity of Glasgow union RailwayOpen
Alloa (1850)Stirling & Dunfermline RailwayClosed
Alloa (2008)Stirling & Dunfermline RailwayOpen
Alloa East JunctionStirling & Dunfermline Railway--
Alloa Harbour JunctionStirling & Dunfermline Railway--
Alloa ShedStirling & Dunfermline Railway--
Alloa Swing BridgeAlloa Railway--
Alloa West JunctionAlloa Railway
Stirling & Dunfermline Railway
--
AlvaAlva RailwayAlloa & AlvaClosed
AnderstonGlasgow Central RailwayOpen
AnnanGlasgow, Dumfries & Carlisle RailwayGlasgow, Dumfries & Carlisle
Kirtlebridge, Annan & Brayton
Open
AnnbankAyr to Mauchline Branch & Associated Lines (GSWR)Ayr & MauchlineClosed
AnnieslandStobcross RailwayOpen
Anstruther (Old)Leven & East of Fife RailwayClosed
Anstruther (1883)Anstruther & St. Andrews RailwayThornton Junction, Anstruther & St. AndrewsClosed
Anstruther JunctionAnstruther & St. Andrews Railway
Leven & East of Fife Railway
--
AppinBallachulish Branch (Callander & Oban Railway)Connel Ferry & BallachulishClosed
Arbroath South S.B.Arbroath (New) Junction Line (Dundee & Arbroath Railway Extensions)--
Ardrossan Montgomerie PierLanarkshire & Ayrshire RailwayClosed
Ardrossan Shed (67D)Ardrossan Railway--
Argyle StreetGlasgow Central RailwayOpen
Arkleston JunctionGlasgow & paisley Joint Railway--
Armadale (1862)Bathgate & Coatbridge RailwayClosed
Armadale (2011)Bathgate & Coatbridge RailwayOpen
ArnistonMarquis of Lothian's Waggonway--
Arrat L.C.Aberdeen Railway--
AuchendinnyPenicuik RailwayEdinburgh (Waverley), Polton & PenicuikClosed
AuchinleckGlasgow, Paisley, Kilmarnock & Ayr RailwayAuchinleck & Muirkirk
Glasgow, Dumfries & Carlisle
Open
AuchtermuchtyFife & Kinross RailwayClosed
AviemoreInverness & Perth Junction RailwayOpen
Aviemore Shed (60B)Inverness & Perth Junction Railway--
AvochFortrose Branch (Highland Railway)Closed
Avon ViaductEdinburgh & Glasgow Railway--
Awe ViaductCallander & Oban Railway--
Ayr (1886)Ayr & Dalmellington RailwayAyr & Mauchline
Kilmarnock & Ayr
Ayr, Dunure & Girvan
Glasgow (St. Enoch) to Kilmarnock (via Dalry), Ardrossan, Largs, Ayr, Girvan & Stranraer
Ayr, Rankinston & Dalmellington
Open
Ayr Harbour JunctionGlasgow, Paisley, Kilmarnock & Ayr Railway--
Ayr Shed (67C)Ayr & Dalmellington Railway--
Ayr ViaductAyr & Dalmellington Railway--

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Dalmeny (1890)

Opened: 28th April, 1890.

Dalmeny Station serves the towns of Dalmeny and South Queensferry, about 8 miles (13km) west of Edinburgh city centre. It is located on the Fife Circle line, immediately south of the Forth Bridge. The station retains its original buildings on the 'down' platform.

The current station is the second to have served the town. The first station opened on 1st March, 1866, and was situated on the South Queensferry branch of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway. The North British Railway closed the original station on 5th March, 1890. It was replaced by the present station upon the opening of the Forth Bridge on 28th April, 1890.

Most trains calling at the station are Fife Circle services; however, the daily service between Glasgow Queen Street and Kirkcaldy via Winchburgh Junction also calls here. The majority of Fife Circle services were extended to Newcraighall from the commencement of the winter 2010 timetable.

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


Ex-North British Railway Class S (LNER Class J37) 0-6-0 No. 64559 comes off the Forth Bridge and approaches Dalmeny Station on 16th July, 1955, with a Fife coast to Glasgow Queen Street train. [David A. Anderson]

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Dalmeny Junction


Ex-North British Railway Class C (LNER Class J36) 0-6-0 No. 65243 MAUDE approaches Dalmeny Junction from South Queensferry with a brake van on 22nd March, 1963. No. 65243 was engaged on the daily 'Ferry Goods' turn on which it had been employed for over thirty years. This was a daily trip-working from Edinburgh to South Queensferry via Ratho and Kirkliston. No. 65243 was built by Neilson & Co. to the design of Matthew Holmes in 1891, and was one of 168 locomotives of its class, of which 123 remained in service upon the formation of British Railways in 1948. No. 65234 was allocated to Haymarket Shed in June 1928 and remained there until that shed closed to steam traction in 1964, whereupon it was transferred to Bathgate Shed until its withdrawal from service in 1966. 'MAUDE' was named after a General of the First World War, Major General Sir Frederick Stanley Maude of the Coldstream Guards, who had a distinguished career including service in the Dardanelles and Mesopotamia before dying of cholera at Baghdad in 1917. Twenty-four other members of the class also carried names associated with the Great War in recognition of the fact that they had been requisitioned by the government in 1917 and sent to France for service on the Western Front. The South Queensferry Branch closed in 1966, but this locomotive has been preserved by the SRPS, and is presently on exhibition in the Scottish Railway Museum at Bo'ness. [K.M. Falconer]

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Royal Elizabeth Yard

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


A northward view along the trackbed of the former South Queensferry Branch at the point where a siding entered the Royal Elizabeth Yard, between Kirkliston and Dalmeny Junction, on 17th July, 2015. The Royal Elizabeth Yard was a Royal Naval Victualling Depot which maintained a store of food supplies sufficient to supply RN ships in the event of an emergency. The site was maintained by the MoD as a storage facility, to provide supplies to RN ships berthed at Port Edgar at South Queensferry and Rosyth in Fife. The site is now a busy trading estate, with 185,000 sq. ft. of good quality secure space on a 50 acre site.

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Newbridge

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


I saw masses of these pea-like flowers in all shades from white, through pink, to deep purple whilst walking along the old South Queensferry Branch from Newbridge to Dalmeny on 15th August, 2010. A flick through my Wild Flowers of Britain book has identified the plant as Indian Balsam. "Nearly all balsams are naturalised foreigners. Indian balsam was introduced from its Asiatic homeland in 1839 and grown in greenhouses before it escaped into the wild."

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Fortrose

Opened: 1st February, 1894.
Closed to passengers: 1st October, 1951.
Closed to all traffic: 13th June, 1960.


Ex-Caledonian Railway 812 Class (LMSR Class 3F) 0-6-0 No. 57594 stands at Fortrose Station at the head of the SLS/RCTS Scottish Railtour 1960 on 14th June, 1960, the day after the line from Muir of Ord closed to regular traffic. An example of the 812 Class has been preserved and can be seen at the Strathspey Railway which runs from Aviemore to Broomhill. [C.J. Gammell]
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Munlochy

Opened: 1st February, 1894.
Closed to passengers: 1st October, 1951.
Closed to all traffic: 13th June, 1960.


Ex-CR 812 Class (LMSR Class 3F) 0-6-0 No. 57594 heads the SLS/RCTS Scottish Railtour 1960 at Munlochy on 14th June, 1960, on the return journey from Fortrose to Muir of Ord. This was the last ever train to work over the Fortrose branch before its complete closure. [Derek Penney]
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Watten

Opened: 28th July, 1874.
Closed: 13th June, 1960.

Watten Station was situated at the east end of Loch Watten, between Halkirk and Wick in the county of Caithness, Scotland. It was one of a number of smaller stations on the Far North Line which were closed in 1960.

Wikipedia page.


Birmingham RCW Type 2 (TOPS Class 26) No. D5340 passes an English Electric Type 1 (TOPS Class 20) at Watten on 25th May, 1965. [Walter Burt Collection]
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Georgemas Junction

Opened: 28th July, 1874.

Georgemas Junction Station serves the village of Halkirk and its surrounding areas in the historic county of Caithness in northern Scotland. It is situated on the Far North Line at the junction of the Thurso branch with the Inverness to Wick line, and is the most northerly railway junction in the United Kingdom.

The station was built by the Sutherland and Caithness Railway, and opened on 28th July, 1874. On that date, the Highland Railway absorbed the S&CR and took over operation of the newly-completed line from Helmsdale to Thurso and Wick. On 1st January, 1923, the Highland Railway was absorbed by the London Midland & Scottish Railway.

Until DMUs were introduced by British Rail in the early 1990s, all trains on the Far North Line were locomotive-hauled. Northbound passenger trains divided at Georgemas Junction with the rear portion proceeding to Thurso and the front portion continuing to Wick. A locomotive was stabled at Georgemas Junction work the Thurso portions.

Following the introduction of Class 156 DMUs on the line, trains from Inverness were composed of two units (four cars), and these divided at Georgemas Junction with the leading unit continuing to Wick and the unit running to Thurso. However, with the introduction of Class 158s, this practice ceased and trains forom Inverness were formed of a single unit only. On arrival at Georgemas Junction from Inverness, trains now reverse to reach Thurso. They then run from Thurso to Wick via Georgemas Junction. Passengers for Wick are permitted to remain on the train between Georgemas Junction and Thurso, which would otherwise technically be off-route.

Georgemas Junction has been used for several freight services. In the early 2000s, EWS operated a freight train for Safeway supermarket, running from Mossend to Georgemas. Containers were unloaded at Georgemas, then transported by road to Wick and Thurso, and by ferry to Orkney. In 2012, Direct Rail Services constructed a new freight terminal adjacent to the station, on the site of the former 'up' platform. This has been used by trains transporting radioactive material from Dounreay to Sellafield.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-LMSR Class 3 2-6-2T No. 40150 stands at Georgemas Junction with a train from Thurso on 14th July, 1959. [C.J. Gammell]

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Thurso

Opened: 28th July, 1874.

Thurso Station serves the town of Thurso and the port of Scrabster (for ferries to Stromness, Orkney), in the county of Caithness in the north of Scotland. It is situated 154 miles (248 km) north of Inverness and is the northernmost station on the National Rail network.

Prior to the introduction of DMUs on the route from Inverness, locomotive-hauled trains from Inverness were split at Georgemas Junction, with one portion continuing to Wick and the other to Thurso. A locomotive would be stabled at Georgemas Junction to take the Thurso portion to and from the junction.

Wikipedia page.


BR Derby Type 2 (TOPS Class 24) No. 5126 stands at the head of a train at Thurso Station on 15th October, 1971. [George Woods]


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The Mound

Opened: 13th April, 1868.
Closed: 13th June, 1960.

The Mound Station was located at the junction of the Sutherland Railway with the Dornoch Light Railway. There were two platforms, one on the main line and one on the branch, and passing loops on both routes. The station building remains in use as a private dwelling but the The Mound Junction S.B. has been demolished.

Wikipedia page.


An unidentified ex-Highland Railway Castle Class (LMSR Class 3P) 4-6-0 heads a Wick to Inverness train at The Mound during the 1930s. [C.R. Gordon Stuart/Lens of Sutton]
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Lairg

Opened: 13th April, 1868.

Lairg Station has a crossing-loop and two platforms. The station building remains, but Lairg North and Lairg South SB have both been demolished. There is a goods yard and a siding for oil traffic. The station formerly served Lairg quarry. The name is pronounced 'Lurg'.

Wikipedia page.
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Oykel Viaduct

This impressive lattice-girder viaduct now has a walkway attached which allows pedestrians to walk from Invershin to Culrain.


On 31st August, 1986, ex-LMSR Class 5 4-6-0 No. 44767 George Stephenson crosses the Kyle of Sutherland on Oykel Viaduct near Invershin with a special train from Inverness to Helmsdale, this being the first occasion on which a steam locomotive had operated on this line since the early 1960s. This train was organised jointly by BR ScotRail and the Scottish Railway Preservation Society in order to test the use of radio signalling equipment on a steam locomotive prior to the introduction of RETB signalling on the West Highland Line. [Roger Siviter]
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Bunchrew


Ex-HR '75' Class 4-6-0 No. 57955 runs along the double-track section beside the Beauly Firth with a northbound goods train from Inverness, circa 1950. All but two locomotives of this class came into BR ownership in 1948. No. 57955 was built by Hawthorn Leslie and entered service as HR No. 80 in October 1919. It was withdrawn in June 1952. [W.J.V. Anderson]
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Dingwall

Opened: 11th June, 1862.

Dingwall Station is of substantial size, with long platforms and large staffed station building. There was a goods yard to the south-west, though only a single siding now remains next to a loading bank. At the north end of the station is a road overbridge, beyond which there was formerly a bay platform. To the south of the bridge there were three platforms. Only the 'Down' and 'Up' main platforms are now in use. In 1956 there was a siding for Scottish Oils and Shell-Mex Ltd. Dingwall North and Dingwall South signal boxes have been demolished.

Wikipedia page.


Birmingham RCW Type 2 (TOPS Class 26) No. 5335 approaches the junction signals at the north end of Dingwall Station on 14th October, 1971, while BR Derby Type 2 (TOPS Class 24) No. 5132 heads towards the station with a short southbound Engineer's train. [George Woods]
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Helmsdale

Opened: 19th June, 1871.

Helmsdale Station is a two-platform station with a crossing-loop. The station buildings, footbridge, and Helmsdale South Signal Box remain, though the former Helmsdale North Signal Box has been demolished. There is a siding to the north of the station. There was formerly a two-road locomotive shed with a turntable (shed-code 60C, closed in 1962). The railway was extended north from Helmsdale towards Wick and Thurso by the Sutherland & Caithness Railway on 28th July, 1874.

Wikipedia page.


BR Derby Type 2 (Class 24) No. D5119 enters Helmsdale Station with a northbound goods train on 7th September, 1963. [M.S. Welch]
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Achnasheen

Achnasheen Station is situated in remote country in the county of Ross & Cromarty, roughly half-way between Dingwall and Kyle of Lochalsh. Although the station serves only a tiny village, it is the railhead for bus services to Wester Ross.


Birmingham RCW Type 2 (TOPS Class 26) No. 5335 heads a train for Kyle of Lochalsh at Achnasheen Station on 14th October, 1971. [George Woods]

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Inverness

Opened: 5th November, 1855.

Inverness Station is located at one apex of a triangular junction, and takes the form of two parallel termini approached, respectively, by lines from the north and from the east and south. Forming the third side of the triangle is a chord which bypasses the station, running between Millburn Junction and Rose Street Junction.

Wikipedia page.

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


Highland Railway Castle Class 4-6-0 No. 145 MURTHLY CASTLE prepares to depart from Platform 2 of Inverness Station with a southbound train during 1906. On the right, awaiting an engine, is a train of Great North of Scotland railway vehicles. [LRGP/P. Tatlow]

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Lochgorm Works


Ex-Highland Railway Class C (LMSR Class 2P) 4-4-0 No. 54398 BEN ALDER stands outside Lochgorm Works, Inverness, in September 1953, seven months after its withdrawal from service. Shortly after the centenary celebrations of the Highland Railway in 1965, British Rail removed this locomotive from its list of locomotives set aside for preservation, and it was scrapped the following year. [Pendragon Collection]

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Millburn Yard

Millburn Yard has sidings for concrete and timber traffic, and sheds for the cleaning and stabling of carriages. The yard was formerly adjacent to the Moray Firth, but following land-reclamation it is now separated from it by industrial estates and the A9 road.


Independent Snowplough No. 1 stands in Millburn Yard, 12th September, 1963. This vehicle had been built the previous year upon the six-wheel chassis of a steam locomotive tender, for use with diesel locomotives following the end of steam traction in the Highlands. [Neil T. Sinclair]

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Millburn Junction


Ex-HR 103 Class (LMSR Class 4F) 4-6-0 No. 103 heads away from Inverness a short way to the east of Millburn Junction with the 14.40 Inverness to Forres special train during a week of celebrations marking the centenary of the formation of the Highland Railway in 1965. The embankment of the direct Inverness & Aviemore Direct Railway, which No. 103 has just passed beneath, can be seen behind the train, whilst the Beauly Firth and the Black Isle are to the right. [Derek Penney]
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Nairn


Viewed from the footbridge at Nairn Station, preserved Highland Railway Class I 4-6-0 No. 103 heads the inaugural Highland Railway Centenary special working from Inverness to Forres on 23rd August, 1965. In the cab are Driver Edward Thorne and Fireman Andrew Robb. [Neil T. Sinclair]
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Moy

Opened: 19th June, 1897.

Moy Station was located 19½ miles from Aviemore Junction and 14¼ miles from Millburn Junction.


Preserved Highland Railway Class I 4-6-0 No. 103 heads the Inverness to Perth leg of the Stephenson Locomotive Society/Railway Correspondence & Travel Society Scottish Rail Tour 1960 between Moy and Tomatin on 15th June, 1960. No. 103, the pioneer British 4-6-0, was preserved by the LMSR after withdrawal from service in 1934, and it was restored to working order and repainted in Stroudley yellow livery by British Railways in 1959, following which it worked special trains until 1965. The locomotive is now a static exhibit in Glasgow Transport Museum. [W.J.V. Anderson]
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Tomatin

Opened: 19th July, 1897.
Closed: 3rd May, 1965.

Tomatin Station was situated 15½ miles from Aviemore Junction and 18¼ miles from Millburn Junction. It had two platforms with a passing-loop and goods yard. The goods yard remains in use by railway engineers, and the passing loop is controlled remotely. The platforms, station house and signalbox remain standing. To the south of the station is Findhorn viaduct.


Viewed from a passing Inverness-bound train, Birmingham RCW Type 2 Bo-Bo (TOPS Class 26) No. 5318 is seen a short distance to the south of Tomatin Station on 29th August, 1963, having failed whilst working a Perth-bound goods train. [Brian J. Dickson]
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Carr Bridge

Opened: 8th July, 1892.

Carr Bridge Station is 6½ miles from Aviemore Junction and 27¼ miles from Millburn Junction. This station has two platforms and a passing loop. There was a large goods yard which was used extensively by Canadian foresters during both World Wars. A narrow gauge railway - now closed and dismantled - ran westwards from the station for the transport of logs. The disused signal box at the south end remains. The north signalbox was incorporated into the station building. The buildings on both platforms remain.

Wikipedia page.
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Culloden

Opened: 1st November, 1898.
Closed:

Culloden Station was 27¾ miles from Aviemore Junction and 6 miles from Millburn Junction. The station is closed, but the line is double track from here to Inverness. To the south of the station is Culloden Viaduct. The goods yard remains, having been used for oil traffic, but is now disused. In steam days, the sidings were used to store redundant locomotives awaiting scrapping.


Ex-Highland Railway Castle Class (LMSR Class 3P) 4-6-0 No. 14677 DUNROBIN CASTLE pilots an LMSR Class 5 4-6-0 near Culloden on a southbound train from Inverness, circa 1936. No. 14677 was built by Dubs & Co. and entered service as HR No. 142 in June 1900, and was withdrawn in February 1939. [C.R. Gordon Stuart/Lens of Sutton]
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Aviemore Shed (60B)

The locomotive shed at Aviemore was opened in 1898 along with the Inverness & Aviemore Direct Railway. It was a four-road, single-ended shed built in local stone with arched doorways and a pitched roof with a central vented clerestory. There was a turntable and an elevated coaling stage at the south end of the shed yard. Aviemore Shed was used by steam locomotives until July 1962, when a couple of diesel shunters were allocated there. It was closed in 1966, but became a working shed again when it was taken over by the Strathspey Railway.


Ex-Highland Railway '103' Class (LMSR Class 4F) 4-6-0 No. 17920 is seen in LMSR pre-1928 black livery at Aviemore Shed in the mid-1930s. This locomotive was built by Sharp, Stewart & Co. and entered service as HR No. 107 in September 1894. It never received the post-1928 LMSR livery, being withdrawn in this condition in October 1937. [Lens of Sutton]

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Forres South S.B.


After arriving from Inverness with the British Rail Highland Centenary special on 26th August, 1965, preserved Highland Railway 103 Class 4-6-0 No. 103 draws its train of two preserved Caledonian Railway carriages past Forres South Signal Box, prior to reversing around the east chord of the Forres triangle. [Norris Forrest/Great North of Scotland Railway Association]