peroxide, me

List of railway stations and locations: A

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StationOpenedTimetablesClosed
ABBEYHILL1st May, 18697th September, 1964
ABBOTSFORD FERRY5th April, 1856Galashiels & Selkirk5th January, 1931
ABERDEEN4th November, 1867Aberdeen, Fraserburgh & Peterhead
Forres, Hopeman, Elgin & Keith
Open
ABERDOUR2nd June, 1890Edinburgh (Waverley) & Glasgow (Queen Street) to Kirkcaldy, Dundee, Arbroath, Montrose & AberdeenOpen
ABERFELDY3rd July, 1865Ballinluig & Aberfeldy3rd May, 1965
ABERFOYLE1st October, 18821st October, 1951
ABERLADY1st April, 1898Aberlady & Gullane12th September, 1932
ABERNETHY18th July, 184819th September, 1955
ABINGTON15th February, 1848Glasgow (Central) and Edinburgh (Princes Street) to Carlisle and South4th January, 1965
ABOYNE
ACHNASHEEN
AIRDRIE (HALLCRAIG STREET)26th December, 1844December 1870
AIRDRIE11th August, 1862Open
ALEXANDRA PARADE1st July, 1881Open
ALLOA (1850)28th August, 18507th October, 1968
ALLOA (2008)19th May, 2008Open
ALVA3rd June, 1863Alloa & Alva1st November, 1954
ALYTH JUNCTION
ANDERSTON10th August, 1896Open
ANNAN23rd August, 1848Glasgow, Dumfries & Carlisle
Kirtlebridge, Annan & Brayton
Open
ANNBANKAyr & Mauchline
ANNIESLAND20th October, 1874Open
ANSTRUTHER (Old)
ANSTRUTHER (1883)1st September, 1883Thornton Junction, Anstruther & St. Andrews6th September, 1965
APPIN24th August, 1903Connel Ferry & Ballachulish28th March, 1966
ARDLUI7th August, 1894Edinburgh, Glasgow, Craigendoran, Fort William & Mallaig
ARDROSSAN MONTGOMERIE PIER30th May, 18906th May, 1968
ARGYLE STREET5th November, 1979Open
ARISAIG1st April, 1901Open
ARMADALE (1862)11th August, 18628th January, 1956
ARMADALE (2011)4th March, 2011Open
ARROCHAR AND TARBET7th August, 1894Edinburgh, Glasgow, Craigendoran, Fort William & Mallaig
AUCHENDINNY2nd July, 1872Edinburgh (Waverley), Polton & Penicuik5th March, 1951
AUCHINLECK9th August, 1848Auchinleck & Muirkirk
Glasgow, Dumfries & Carlisle
Open
AUCHTERARDER22nd May, 184811th June, 1956
AUCHTERMUCHTY6th June, 18575th June, 1950
AVIEMORE
AVOCH1st February, 18941st October, 1951
AYR (1886)12th January, 1886Ayr & Mauchline
Kilmarnock & Ayr
Ayr, Dunure & Girvan
Glasgow (St. Enoch) to Kilmarnock (via Dalry), Ardrossan, Largs, Ayr, Girvan & Stranraer
Ayr, Rankinston & Dalmellington
Open

Other Locations
Abbeyhill Junction
Aberdeen Harbour
Alloa East Junction
Alloa Harbour Junction
Alloa Shed
Alloa Swing Bridge
Alloa West Junction
Anstruther Junction
Arbroath South S.B.
Ardrossan Shed (67D)
Arkleston Junction
Arniston
Arrat L.C.
Auchendinny East Tunnel
Auchendinny Viaduct
Auchendinny West Tunnel
Auchmuty Junction
Aviemore Shed (60B)
Avon Viaduct
Awe Viaduct
Ayr Harbour Junction
Ayr Shed (67C)
Ayr Viaduct

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Abbotsford Ferry

Selkirk & Galashiels Railway
Opened: 5th April, 1856.
Closed to passengers: 5th January, 1931.

Abbotsford Ferry Station was situated on the branch line from Galashiels to Selkirk in the county of Selkirkshire. The station was near Abbotsford House, formerly the residence of historical novelist and poet Sir Walter Scott. The remaining part of the timber-faced platform of the station is situated in the front garden of a house. It is in poor condition and will probably not survive much longer. The trackbed is used as a bridle path.

Wikipedia page.


A pre-1923 view of Abbotsford Ferry Station from across the River Tweed. [Lens of Sutton Association]

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Banavie Swing Bridge

Mallaig Extension Railway


Ex-LNER Class B1 4-6-0 No. 61342 passes over the Caledonian Canal on the Banavie Swing Bridge with a train for Mallaig during 1961. Banavie Signal Box, which controlled the railway signalling as well as the opening and closing of the adjacent road and railway swing bridges, is hidden behind the train. [Michael Mensing]

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Bathgate (2011)

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


A so-called 'Accessible Toilet' in the then-new Bathgate Station on 26th July, 2011. A prime example, in my opinion, of fatuous political correctness: a toilet really wouldn't be of much use if it wasn't accessible, would it?

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Rhu

West Highland Railway
Opened as Row: 7th August, 1894.
Renamed Rhu: 24th February, 1924.
Closed: 9th January, 1956.
Re-opened: 4th April, 1960.
Closed: 15th June, 1964.

Wikipedia page.


North British Railway Class C 0-6-0 No. 555 stands at Row Station with a passenger train on an unknown date. [C. Lawson Kerr Collection]
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Lybster

Wick & Lybster Light Railway
Opened: 1st July, 1903.
Closed: 3rd April, 1944.

Lybster Station was the southern terminus of the Wick and Lybster Light Railway, situated in the county of Caithness in northern Scotland. It was opened on 1st July, 1903. Along with the other stations on the line, Lybster Station was closed on 3rd April, 1944. The station building now serves as the clubhouse for Lybster golf course.

Wikipedia page.


An early scene at Lybster Station with railway staff gathered on the platform to see off what may have been the first train over the railway. The locomotive is Highland Railway 0-4-4T No. 53 Lybster, which worked the line from its opening until it was withdrawn as LMSR No. 15050 in 1929. [Lens of Sutton]

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Fort William (1894)

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.
Closed: 13th June, 1975.

The old station at Fort William was the original terminus of the West Highland Railway from Craigendoran. It was located between the town's main street and the shore of Loch Linnhe, and in the past it was considered unfortunate that the town was cut off from the waterfront by the railway; however, the dual carriageway which replaced the station in the 1970s has resulted in even more dislocation. The station had a red-brick building and three short platforms: two bays, and one which ran a short distance beyond the the station buildings onto the quayside, all with attractive canopies. The station was closed in 1975 when it was replaced by a new, modern structure some distance from the town centre, and its site is now obliterated by the aforementioned dual carriageway.


A view of Fort William (1894) Station in 1905. [Kenneth G. Williamson]

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Banavie Pier

West Highland Railway
Opened: 31st May, 1895.
Closed to passengers: 4th September, 1939.
Closed to goods: 6th August, 1951.


A southward view from the Caledonian Canal towards Banavie Pier Station on an unknown date between the First and Second World Wars. A set of carriages stands in the loop at Banavie Pier Station, and the points at the near end set to divert any runaway vehicles from the line serving the canal into the adjacent goods yard. [Bill Read Collection/John McGregor]

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Fort William (1975)

West Highland Railway
Opened: 13th June, 1975.

The present Fort William Station is 99½ miles from Craigendoran. This is the terminus of the West Highland Railway. This is a relatively new station, built to replace the Fort William's original terminus which occupied a site approximately ½-mile to the south, in the centre of the town. The site of the old station has now been obliterated by a dual carriageway. The bus station, car parks and supermarkets are nearby, and a pedestrian underpass beneath the main road takes passengers into the town.

Wikipedia page.

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


A BR Derby Type 2 (TOPS Class 25) heads a train at Fort William (1975) station during July 1980. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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County March Summit

West Highland Railway


A pair of English Electric Type 3s (Class 37s), Nos. 37 170 and 37 409 'Loch Awe', approach County March Summit along the flanks of Beinn Odhar with the 10.30 Fort William Yard to Mossend Yard goods train on 12th September, 1996. The footpath in the foreground forms part of the West Highland Way, a walking route from Milngavie to Fort William which has in recent years become a popular route for walkers. [Keith Sanders]
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Tulloch

West Highland Railway
Opened as Inverlair: 7th August, 1894.
Renamed Tulloch: 1st January, 1895.

For a West Highland line station, Tulloch is unusual having two side platforms. The station building and signal box remain, with the main building being in use as a hostel. The headshunt of the former goods yard is used by the civil engineer.

Wikipedia page.


NBL Type 2 (TOPS Class 21) No. D6137 leads preserved ex-North British Railway Class K (LNER Class D34) 4-4-0 No. 256 GLEN DOUGLAS through Tulloch Station with the Glasgow Queen Street to Fort William leg of the Scottish Locomotive Preservation Fund The Jacobite railtour on 1st June, 1963. No. D6137 had been added to assist the train at Rannoch, replacing ex-NBR Class S (LNER Class J37) 0-6-0 No. 64632 which had failed earlier at Gorton Crossing. No. D6137 was one of twenty NBL Type 2s which had their unreliable MAN engines replaced by Paxman units following trials with No. D6123. [G.W. Morrison]

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Rannoch

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.

Rannoch Station has an island platform which retains its chalet-style building and signal box. Access to the platform is by means of a recently-installed footbridge with a West Highland-style entrance building; the original footbridge was removed in the 1980s. At the north end of the station is a memorial made by the navvies who built the railway to Mr Renton, who used his personal fortune to pay for completion of the line when the West Highland company ran out of funds. There was formerly a siding with a turntable on which a camping coach was berthed during the summer. Camping coaches remain here, but the siding has been lifted. There are two engineer's sidings on the west side of the station. A short distance to the north is Rannoch Viaduct at the start of the climb to Corrour Summit, 1,350ft. above sea level.


Ex-LNER Class K4 2-6-0 No. 61995 CAMERON OF LOCHIEL departs northbound from Rannoch Station in June 1960. [Derek Penney]

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Gorton Crossing

West Highland Railway

Gorton Crossing, between Bridge of Orchy and Rannoch Stations, was the location of a loop, signal box and platform, and was one of the most remote railway locations in the British Isles. An old carriage was placed on the platform for use as a school classroom for local children. This section of the West Highland line is particularly susceptible to bad weather, and the line was completely covered by snow in January 1963.
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Glen Douglas

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894, or 7th August, 1895 as Glen Douglas Siding.
Renamed Glen Douglas Platform (Private): by September 1926.
Renamed Glen Douglas (Private): by May 1942.
Renamed Glen Douglas Halt: 12th June, 1961.
Closed: 15th June, 1964.

Wikipedia page.


War Department 2-8-0 No. 77206 heads a northbound class D goods train near Glen Douglas during 1944. [C. Lawson Kerr]

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Garelochhead

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.

Garelochhead Station is situated on the West Highland Line and serves the village of Garelochhead, on the Gare Loch, in the West Highlands of Scotland. It opened to passengers on 7 August 1894. The station was laid out with a crossing loop and an island platform. There were sidings on both sides, and a turntable on the west side of the line. From its opening in 1894, the West Highland Railway was worked throughout by the electric token system. Garelochhead signal box, which had 18 levers, was situated on the island platform. The siding on the east side was removed in 1983. The semaphore signals were removed on 2nd February, 1986, in preparation for the introduction of Radio Electronic Token Block signalling by British Rail. On 15th February, 1987, the crossing loop was altered to right-hand running. The original 'down' platform thus became the 'up' platform, and vice versa. The change was made to simplify shunting at this station, by removing the need to hand-operate the points giving access the siding. The RETB signalling, which is controlled from a Signalling Centre at Banavie railway station, was commissioned between Helensburgh Upper and Upper Tyndrum on 27th March, 1988. The Train Protection & Warning System was installed in 2003. During 2011, from Monday to Saturday, there were three combined northbound trains to Oban and Mallaig, plus the Highland Caledonian Sleeper to Fort William. Southbound, there were four trains to Glasgow Queen Street (three on Saturdays) plus the Highland Caledonian Sleeper to London Euston (the sleeper did not run on Saturdays). On Sundays, there was one train northbound to Oban and Mallaig and two trains southbound to Glasgow Queen Street and London Euston.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-North British Railway Class L (LNER Class C16) No. 9441 heads a Craigendoran to Arrochar and Tarbet train near Garelochhead on an unknown date during the LNER era. [E.R. Morten]

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Fort William Yard

West Highland Railway

Goods traffic on the West Highland Railway included coal, fish, general merchandise, alumina from Burntisland for the smelter at Fort William, and timber for the pulp and paper mill at Corpach.


Ex-North British Railway Class C (LNER Class J36) 0-6-0 No. 65300, the British Aluminium Co. pilot, shunts wagons in Fort William Yard during March 1959. The wagons would be propelled to Mallaig Junction. The yard pilot at this time was No. 65313 of the same class. [David Hepburne-Scott/Colour-Rail]
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Shandon

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.
Closed: 14th June, 1964.

Shandon Station was situated on the hillside high above Faslane Naval Base on the Gare Loch. On 14th October, 1895, it was the scene of a potentially-serious accident involving the 4.20pm train from Fort William to Glasgow Queen Street. That evening was very wild with strong winds and torrential rain, and John Crawford, the signalman, did not see the train coming as it ran into the station, and he moved the points as it passed over them. He then witnessed a horrific spectacle as the two locomotives and the leading carriage of the train ran around the right-hand side of the island platform, while the second carriage ran onto the platform and overturned and the remainder of the train ran around the left-hand side. Only one passenger required hospital treatment, but things could have been a great deal worse.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-North British Railway Class M (LNER Class C15) 4-4-2T No. 67474 heads an Arrochar and Tarbet to Craigendoran train near Shandon during July 1958. [C. Lawson Kerr]
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Craigendoran Upper

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.
Closed: 14th June, 1964.

Craigendoran Upper Station served the village of Craigendoran, a short way to the east of Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire. It was opened by the West Highland Railway on 7th June, 1894, and, along with Craigendoran Lower and Craigendoran Pier Stations, formed part of a complex of three stations at Craigendoran. Craigendoran Upper was served by West Highland trains until the station's closure on 14th June, 1964. However, Craigendoran Lower Station is served by frequent trains from Edinburgh and Glasgow to Helensburgh.

Until 1937, Craigendoran had three signal boxes: Craigendoran East, Craigendoran Junction and Craigendoran West. The West box closed on 2nd May, 1937. On 28th March, 1960, the East box closed and the remaining signal box, Craigendoran Junction, was renamed Craigendoran. A replacement signal box with an NX control panel was opened on 4th November, 1984, at which time the track layout at Craigendoran Junction was simplified. The present layout consists of a crossing loop on the West Highland line, and single lines to Helensburgh Upper and Helensburgh Central. The 1984 signal box was closed in 1992, with control then passing to Yoker Signalling Centre (IECC) which controls the whole North Clyde Line.

Wikipedia page.


A westward view along the island platform of Craigendoran Upper Station on 8th March, 1958, with ex-LNER Class V3 2-6-2T No. 67667 on the left standing at Craigendoran Lower with a train from Helensburgh. Beyond No. 67667 can be seen the lines that ran to Craigendoran Pier Station, with the station buildings and the pier visible above the locomotive. On the right, ex-North British Railway Class M (LNER Class C15) 4-4-2T No. 67460 stands at the upper station with a push-pull train from Arrochar and Tarbet. [W.S. Sellar]

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Crianlarich

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.

Crianlarich Station has an island platform. The original station building has been demolished, but a new, smaller building in West Highland style has been constructed at the south end of the platform. At the north end the original signal box and tearoom building remain. In times past the tearoom provided lunch-baskets to the trains here. The locomotive shed remains and is now used as a civil engineer's depot.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-North British Railway Class K Glen (LNER Class D34) 4-4-0 No. 9405 GLEN SPEAN takes water at Crianlarich Station on an unknown date during the LNER era. [Peter Tatlow Collection]

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Arrochar and Tarbet

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.

Arrochar and Tarbet Station is situated on the West Highland line and serves the villages of Arrochar and Tarbet. It was opened on 7th August, 1894, by the West Highland Railway, and is located 19¾ miles from Craigendoran and 80¼ miles from Fort William. The station was laid out with a crossing loop and island platform, with sidings on the 'up' side. From its opening, the West Highland Railway was worked throughout by the electric token system. Arrochar & Tarbet signal box, which had 17 levers, was situated on the island platform.

A push-pull shuttle service ran between Arrochar and Tarbet and Craigendoran. During the 1950s there were four trains each way, worked by ex-North British Railway Class M (LNER Class C15) 4-4-2Ts Nos. 67460 and 67474; these locomotives being used exclusively on this service. The locomotive and train were stabled overnight in a siding alongside the station, and the locomotive remained in steam all night. A fireman was dispatched from Helensburgh for this duty, which was not particularly arduous: rumour has it that many an hour was spent by the fireman dozing 'on the cushions' between checking the fire. A diesel railbus of much lower capacity later replaced the push-pull trains, but the service was withdrawn on 14th June, 1964.

The semaphore signals were removed on 19th January, 1986, in preparation for the introduction of Radio Electronic Token Block (RETB) by British Rail. Following the closure of the signal box, the lever frame was removed for re-use on the Leadhills & Wanlockhead Railway. The RETB system was commissioned between Helensburgh Upper and Tyndrum Upper on 27th March, 1988, and is controlled from a signalling centre at Banavie Station. When the platform was extended southwards, the redundant signal box was relocated slightly further north for use as a waiting room. In 2000, after the station building had to be demolished due to subsidence, a replica of the signal box was built in the centre of the island platform. The original signal box also remains. The Train Protection & Warning System was installed in 2003. The sidings on the east side of the station were used for loading timber until December 2008, when the carriage of timber by rail ceased. As of June 2015, there is no sign of this service being reinstated.

In July 1922, there were three northbound departures from Arrochar and Tarbet: the 7.15am and 1.4pm to Mallaig and the 5.6pm to Fort William. There were seven southbound departures, plus one extra Saturdays-only train: the 7.25am and 10.0am to Glasgow Queen Street Low Level, the 12.15pm to Queen Street High Level, the 1.5pm to Queen Street Low Level, the 3.0pm to Queen Street High Level, the 4.40pm SX and 5.22pm SO to Queen Street Low Level, the 7.9pm to Queen Street High Level and the 7.33pm SO to Craigendoran. Presently, there are three trains to Oban and Mallaig and one to Fort William (the Caledonian Sleeper) on Mondays to Saturdays, and four trains to Glasgow Queen Street and one Saturdays-excepted to London Euston. The southbound Caledonian Sleeper does not run on Saturdays. On Sundays, there is just one northbound train to Oban and Mallaig, and two trains southbound to Glasgow Queen Street and London Euston respectively.

Wikipedia page:.

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


Ex-Great Northern Railway Class H3 (LNER Class K2) 2-6-0 No. 61772 LOCH LOCHY heads a train near Arrochar & Tarbet Station during August 1949. [C. Lawson Kerr]

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Ardlui

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.

Ardlui Station serves the village of Ardlui at the north end of Loch Lomond. It is situated on the West Highland line, 51 miles from Glasgow Queen Street, 27¾ miles from Craigendoran and 72¼ miles from Fort William, and opened to passengers on 7th August 1894. The station was laid out with a crossing loop and an island platform, and there are three sidings on the east side of the station.

From the time of its opening, the West Highland Railway was worked throughout by the electric token system. Ardlui signal box was situated on the island platform. Circa 1970, the main station building, of the standard West Highland design, had to be demolished due to subsidence. An open waiting area was then built onto the signal box. The semaphore signals were removed on 12th January, 1986, in preparation for the introduction of Radio Electronic Token Block (RETB) by British Rail. The crossing loop was altered to right-hand running on 8th February, 1987, when the original 'down' platform became the 'up' platform, and vice-versa. The change was made in order to simplify shunting at the station by removing the need to operate the points by hand to access the sidings. RETB, which is controlled from a Signalling Centre at Banavie railway station, was commissioned between Helensburgh Upper and Tyndrum Upper on 27th March, 1988. The Train Protection & Warning System was installed in 2003.

Due to its remote location, Ardlui has been one of the least-used stations on the West Highland line; in 1930, only 887 tickets were issued, bringing in a revenue of just £161. In July 1922, Ardlui was served by three 'down' trains on Mondays to Saturdays: the 7.30am and 1.19pm to Mallaig, and the 5.23pm to Fort William; and three 'up': the 11.57am, 2.42pm and 6.51pm to Glasgow Queen Street. Except Saturdays, the 6.51pm to Glasgow Queen Street included through sleeping cars to London King's Cross. Presently, there are three northbound trains to Oban and Mallaig on Mondays to Saturdays and one (the Caledonian Sleeper) to Fort William. Southbound, there are three trains to Glasgow Queen Street and one to London Euston. The Caledonian Sleeper does not run on Saturdays. On Sundays, there is just one northbound train to Oban and Mallaig and two southbound trains; one each to Glasgow Queen Street and London Euston.

Wikipedia page.

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


Ex-LNER Class K1 2-6-0 No. 61997 MACCAILIN MOR heads the morning Mallaig to Glasgow (Queen Street) train at a location to the south of Ardlui Station during July 1953. [C. Lawson Kerr]

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Crianlarich Lower Junction

Callander & Oban Railway
West Highland Railway


Connection with the Callander & Oban Railway. The connecting line between the West Highland and the Callander & Oban Railways at Crianlarich was built by the West Highland Railway, and opened to traffic on 20th December, 1897; however, regular passenger services over the line did not commence until 23rd May, 1949.


Birmingham RCW Type 2 (TOPS Class 27) No. D5350 approaches the Callander & Oban line at Crianlarich Lower Junction on 27th May, 1965, during a shunting move between Crianlarich Upper and Lower Stations. The train has passed over the chord between the West Highland line and the Callander & Oban, and is approaching what was formerly known as Crianlarich Glasgow Junction. In the background is the viaduct carrying the West Highland Line over the Callander & Oban line, beyond which is Crianlarich Lower Station. [Noel Machell]

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Corrour

West Highland Railway
Opened: 7th August, 1894.

Corrour Station is situated on the West Highland line near Loch Ossian and Loch Treig on the Corrour Estate in the West Highlands of Scotland. It is located 71¾ miles from Craigendoran and 28¼ miles from Fort William and is the highest main line railway station in the United Kingdom, and it was originally built to serve the Corrour Estate. It is also one of the most remote stations in the United Kingdom, being situated at an isolated location on Rannoch Moor, and is not accessible by any public roads; the nearest road is 10 miles away. Sir John Stirling-Maxwell (10th Baronet of Pollok, KT) purchased the Corrour Estate in 1891 and initially used it as a 'playground' for gentlemen, primarily focusing on activities such as stalking and hunting. To make the estate accessible for his guests, Sir John gave permission for the West Highland Railway to build across his land on condition that they built a station on his estate. Corrour Station opened to passengers on 7th August, 1894. Guests visiting the estate for deer-stalking and grouse-shooting were taken from the station to the head of Loch Ossian by horse-drawn carriage. A small steamer then transported them to a shooting lodge at the far end of the loch.

The station was laid out with a passing loop around an island platform, with a siding on the east side. The signal box, which had 13 levers, was situated to the south of the island platform. From the time of its opening, the West Highland Railway was worked throughout by the electric token system. The semaphore signals were removed in November 1985 in preparation for the introduction of Radio Electronic Token Block (RETB). Since November 1985, all passenger trains have used the original 'down' platform. At the same time, the loop points came under the control of ground frames. The 'up' loop remains in situ and is serviceable but it is no longer used by passenger trains. The RETB system was commissioned by British Rail between Tyndrum Upper and Mallaig Junction on 29th May, 1988. This resulted in the closure of Corrour Signal Box along with the others on that section of the line. The RETB is controlled from a Signalling Centre at Banavie Station.

There was formerly a footbridge at Corrour providing an exit to the east side of the station, but it was moved to Rannoch railway station following the downgrading of the 'up' loop at Corrour. Passengers now cross the line by way of a level crossing. Corrour Station and the nearby mountain, Leum Uilleim, gained fame when they were featured in a scene from the 1996 film, 'Trainspotting'. In 1997 a new station house, including lodging for its managers, was commissioned by Corrour Estate. Designed by the Law & Dunbar-Nasmith Partnership, it was erected as a provisions shop and restaurant to serve hillwalkers. Corrour Station also appeared in the fourth episode of the 2010 BBC series, 'Secret Britain', and featured in the Young Guns video for the single 'Weight of the World'. The station was also the primary location in Jos Stelling's film, 'De Wisselwachter'. The route south from Corrour across Rannoch Moor to Rannoch Station was used as a filming location in the Harry Potter films where a Death Eater (fictional character) was seen to stand between the rails with an outstretched arm to bring the approaching Hogwarts Express to a stand for the train to be inspected. Warner Brothers spent a couple of days with equipment based at Rannoch to facilitate the filming sequences.

The waiting-room on the platform is somewhat rudimentary, which can make waiting here an unpleasant experience in mid-winter. After several previous ventures in this location, the station building was reopened as a restaurant in August 2012. The restaurant was one of the most remote in the UK. There were also three en-suite letting bedrooms. The old signal box and adjacent building were renovated in 2015; however, the Corrour Station House Restaurant closed in June 2015. Loch Ossian Youth Hostel, one of the most remote youth hostels in Britain, is about located about one mile from the railway station and is accessed by a dirt-track road. At 1,339 ft above sea level, Corrour Station provides a convenient starting-point for hill-walkers and Munro-baggers. The station was the starting point for the 'Man with no Name' whose body was found in 1996 on Ben Alder and only identified some years later. Corrour Summit, the highest point on the West Highland line at an altitude of 1,350 ft, is a short distance to the north of the station.

Corrour is presently served by three northbound trains to Mallaig and one to Fort William (the Caledonian Sleeper) from Monday to Saturday, plus three southbound trains to Glasgow Queen Street and one to London Euston (the Caledonian Sleeper). The Caledionian Sleeper does not run on Saturdays. On Sundays, there is just one northbound train to Mallaig (two in summer) and one southbound train to Glasgow Queen Street (two in summer), plus the Caledonian Sleeper to London Euston. The journey from London to Corrour by the Caledonian Sleeper takes just under twelve hours.

Wikipedia page.

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


A train from Glasgow Queen Street to Mallaig via Fort William is passed by a southbound goods train headed by a Birmingham RCW Type 2 (TOPS Class 27) at Corrour Station during July 1980. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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Bridge of Orchy

West Highland Railway

Opened: 7th August, 1894.

Bridge of Orchy Station serves the village of Bridge of Orchy in the West Highlands of Scotland. It is situated on the West Highland line, and was opened by the West Highland Railway on 7th August, 1894. The station was laid out with a crossing loop around an island platform accessed via a subway, with sidings on the east side of the station.

The signal box, which had 16 levers, was situated at the south end of the island platform. From the time of its opening, the West Highland Railway was worked throughout by the electric token system. In 1967, the method of working between Crianlarich to the south and Rannoch to the north was changed to the Scottish Region Tokenless Block system. The Up loop at Bridge of Orchy was signalled for running in either direction and the signal box was able to 'switch out' when not required. In August 1985, the method of working between Crianlarich and Rannoch reverted to the electric token block system. The semaphore signals were removed on 24th November, 1985, in preparation for the introduction of Radio Electronic Token Block (RETB). On 1st February, 1987, the crossing loop was altered to right-hand running. The original 'down' platform thus became the 'up' platform, and vice-versa. The change was made in order to simplify shunting at this station, by removing the need to work the points giving access to the sidings by hand. The RETB system was commissioned by British Rail between Tyndrum Upper and Fort William Junction on 29th May, 1988. This resulted in the closure of Bridge of Orchy signal box along with the others on the section between Tyndrum and Fort William. The RETB is controlled from a Signalling Centre at Banavie Station. The Train Protection & Warning System was installed in 2003.

In July 1922, there were three northbound departures from Monday to Saturday from Bridge of Orchy: the 8.28am and 2.19pm to Mallaig and the 6.30pm to Fort William. There were three southbound trains: the 11.6am, 1.44pm and 5.59pm to Glasgow Queen Street High Level. Bridge of Orchy is presently served by three northbound trains to Mallaig and one to Fort William (the Caledonian Sleeper) from Monday to Saturday, plus three southbound trains to Glasgow Queen Street and one to London Euston (the Caledonian Sleeper). The Caledionian Sleeper does not run on Saturdays. On Sundays, there is just one northbound train to Mallaig (two in summer) and one southbound train to Glasgow Queen Street (two in summer), plus the Caledonian Sleeper to London Euston. The station building is now used as a bunkhouse for those walking the West Highland Way. The Bridge of Orchy Hotel is opposite the end of the access road to the station.

Wikipedia page.


A southward view from the north end of Bridge of Orchy Station on 3rd September, 1975 [David Christie]

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Fort William Shed

West Highland Railway


An observation car, built for the pre-war LNER Coronation high-speed train, is propelled onto the turntable at Fort William on 18th June, 1960, by an ex-NBR Class C (LNER Class J36) 0-6-0. Ex-LNER Class K4 2-6-0 No. 61995 CAMERON OF LOCHIEL, which had brought The White Cockade railtour from Glasgow that day, receives attention on the right. [Derek Penney]

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Monessie Gorge

West Highland Railway


A pair of NBL Type 2s (Class 29s), Nos. D6129 in British Rail blue livery and D6124 in two-tone green, pass through Monessie Gorge between Roy Bridge and Tulloch with the evening through train from Fort William to London Euston in April 1968. The West Highland Railway, the main A86 road and the River Spean pass through the gorge in close proximity. [Derek Cross]

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Fort William Junction

West Highland Railway

This is the junction between the line from Glasgow to Fort William and that from Fort William to Mallaig. Originally, it was known as Banavie Junction as it was the junction for the short branch to Banavie Pier. It was renamed Mallaig Junction upon the opening of the Mallaig Extension Railway. It has more recently been renamed Fort William Junction in order to prevent confusion about its location. The signal box remains operational here. Between the junction and Fort William Station are oil sidings which in 2011 received a once-weekly oil train.


A Birmingham RCW Type 2 (Class 27) runs between Fort William Junction and Fort William Station with a train from Glasgow Queen Street during October 1975. [Eastbank Model Railway Society]
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Wellesley Colliery

National Coal Board


0-6-0ST NCB East Fife Area No. 7 (NBL Works No.16463 of 1904) seen at Wellesley Colliery, Methil, 17th April, 1965. This site is now occupied by a large factory producing wind turbines. In the background is the White Swan Hotel on Wellesley Road. The loco was built for the Wemyss Coal Co. at the NBL's Hyde Works, Glasgow, and worked at the Wellesley Colliery until circa 1966. It was transferred to Cowdenheath Central Workshops in July 1967 and scrapped there in December 1968. [Charlie Verrall]

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Methil

Wemyss Private Railway


NCB 0-6-0T Fife Area No. 8, built by Andrew Barclay in 1912 and fitted with a Giesl ejector in place of a conventional chimney, is seen engaged in shunting duties at Methil on 19th April, 1968. This locomotive ended its working life at Bedlay Colliery in Lanarkshire. To the left of the photo, a double-decker bus can be seen passing along Methil High Street behind the railway, while on the high embankment is Wellesley Road. [W.A.C. Smith]

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Hugo Colliery

Wemyss Private Railway

Photos by rock_dinosaur except where otherwise credited.


This dilapidated gate at the west end of Coaltown of Wemyss, seen on 24th July, 2011, once controlled the level crossing of the Wemyss High Road - the main road from Kirkcaldy to Buckhaven - and the mineral railway that ran from Lochhead Colliery, to the north of the Coaltown, to the Hugo Pit. The roofless shells of some of the pithead buildings of the Hugo still exist in a field a short distance beyond the crossing gate, but I saw no sign of the tunnel that led from there down to the Victoria pit at West Wemyss.

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Gartmore

Strathendrick & Aberfoyle Railway
Opened: 1st October, 1882.
Closed to passengers: 29th September, 1951.
Closed to goods: 5th October, 1959.

Gartmore Station situated was over a mile to the north-east the village of Gartmore.


Ex-LNER Class K2 2-6-0 No. 61788 Loch Rannoch heads the Aberfoyle to Glasgow Queen Street leg of the Glasgow University Aberfoyle Excursion railtour at Gartmore Station on 16th May, 1959. [W.S. Sellar]

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Aberfoyle

Strathendrick & Aberfoyle Railway
Opened: 1st October, 1882.
Closed to passengers: 1st October, 1951.

Aberfoyle Station served the village of Aberfoyle, Perthshire, and was the northern terminus of the Strathendrick & Aberfoyle Railway. Following closure to passengers on 1st October, 1951, the station was demolished and it the site is now occupied by a car park.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-North British Railway Class C (LNER Class J36) 0-6-0 No. 65315 prepares to leave Aberfoyle for Glasgow St. Enoch with the Stephenson Locomotive Society Strathendrick Special railtour on 3rd May, 1958. Being the 'Gateway to the Trossachs', Aberfoyle was a popular destination for Glaswegians. The spacious station yard was intended to cope with anticipated traffic that never materialised. [W.S. Sellar]

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Penicuik

Penicuik Railway


A north-eastward view from a footbridge over the River North Esk which has been constructed where the railway has been diverted away from the trackbed of the Penicuik Railway, at a location near the former Penicuik Station upon which the houses of Lower Valleyfield View have been built.

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South Queensferry

South Queensferry branch (Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway)


Ex-North British Railway Class S (LNER Class J37) 0-6-0 No. 64603 stands at the VAT 69 whisky warehouse at South Queensferry, having arrived with the Dalmeny Junction to South Queensferry leg of the SLS (Scottish Area)/BLS Scottish Rambler No.2 (Joint Easter Rail Tour) on 13th April, 1963. Preserved North British Railway Class K (LNER Class D34) 4-4-0 No. 256 GLEN DOUGLAS was at the rear of the train. [Michael Clemens]

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